Friday Feb 03, 2023

Where is the Line That Separates Journalism From Politics?

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A North Platte, Nebraska television broadcaster was recently fired for political involvement. This raises serious questions about journalism and politics. What can a journalist do in his life? What rights do they give up? And, more than a sign? According to news reports, Melanie Standiford has been fired as a news anchor and anchor for KNOP-TV in North Platte after getting signatures on a petition calling for her city to become a sanctuary city for unborn children.

The petition, one of many similar in Nebraska, calls for the issue to be on the ballot in November. According to local reports, Standiford agreed to collect bequests at his church. When his superiors found out about the news, they immediately fired him, saying that journalists “are not allowed to be involved in politics at any time and under any circumstances.” their beliefs, involvement in politics for a candidate, party or election”.

Standiford told the newspaper that she is pro-life but has always been candid about the issue. So where is the line? I know journalists who refuse to vote out of fear that the nomination process will limit their ability to report accurately. During my career, I have voluntarily given up things that most Americans are free to do, such as making political donations, signing papers, or attending rallies. However, voting is a secret and, in my opinion, an important part of being an American 카지노사이트. I always vote.

But my wife will tell you that I drew clearly from any other politics. He had a career in politics as a candidate and school principal. While our neighbors are waving their campaign signs, our backyard is empty. His family photo in the brochure showed just him and our three children, not me. Sometimes he looks at my orders, but he respects them. I want to be so far from the line that no one can accuse me of crossing it. Of course, every reporter can draw the line differently. There are a lot of gray areas, but the Nebraska legend has clearly crossed paths.

The New York Times now adds a sidebar to the political story that explains “How Times reporters cover politics.” It reads, in part, “Thus, while Times reporters may vote, they are not permitted to endorse or broadcast for political parties or causes.” The policy prohibits campaign contributions and public appearances. Not only is this politically savvy, but it is a good thing for The Times to be clear about politics for the readers, instead of assuming they know about it, especially at a very political time.

For most journalists, the rules are clear but sometimes questions arise. We encourage employees to get involved in their communities, but let us know if any red flags come up. Is it okay to volunteer on the church board? Is it good to be in a video for United Way? Often the answer is “it depends”. But the rule is “no surprise”. If a member of staff has a question about their involvement, it is important to speak to management so that we can consider it first. For news consumers, it should be reassuring that there are newsrooms with clear ethical standards and that you can trust them to uphold the law.

For Nebraska’s licensed television news anchor, it seems the red flag either didn’t appear in his mind, or he just ignored it. He should have discussed it with his boss before collecting signatures. The station is owned by a large corporation with more than 100 TV stations across the country. They won’t let their ethics waver when a reporter crosses the line. A Slice of North Carolina’s Casino Profits Go to Political Relatives

His dismissal sends a clear message to thousands of other journalists: stay so far away from the line that your charges cannot cross it. And if you don’t know where the line is, talk to your manager before that red flag becomes a red flag at your job.

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Marianne Kaiser

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